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What You’re Already Doing to Bolster Your Blog Traffic

posted by Matt Ward on Dec 15, 2009.

Pretty much every blog wants to increase traffic to his or her site. This is especially true of new bloggers. In this article, I’m going to look at the one thing you’re already doing to help foster growth in this area!

Let’s be honest – blog traffic is addictive. If your an active and committed blog owner, it’s never far from your mind, and no matter how far you come, no matter how much traffic you bring in over a given period of time, no matter how happy or satisfied you may be in a given moment, somehow you’re always left craving more, looking for a way to boost that traffic by just another degree.

I’m right aren’t I? If not, you’re either not human, not fully committed to your blog, or in possession of superhuman willpower and focus (we’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume the third).

What You're Already Doing to Bolster Your Blog Traffic

What You're Already Doing to Bolster Your Blog Traffic

But why should traffic be so addictive? Probably because it’s the clearest indication of success, at least in it’s narrowest of forms. We all want our sites to be successful. Even if we’re giving away free information and resources, we want to see that our content is being consumed. Traffic stats are a good place to start, and probably one of the most readily accessible. Plus, while a picture is worth a thousand words, a good set of numbers and data can be worth at least that, and probably more.

Just ask a mathematician!

And that functions as a beautiful segue. I was originally considering calling this article something along the lines of “The Arithmetic of Increased Blog Traffic,” but I thought that such a title would scare a few people off. We are going to be talking about a bit of math, but it will be really simple, I promise!

Now, if you read at all about blogging, you’ve probably heard that common axiom: content is king. I’ve read this kind of thing so many times I’ve lost count. I’ve even written about it myself, in articles like 8 Reasons Why You Probably Shouldn’t Start a Design Blog. I’m not going to try to contradict this concept. After all, content is the foundation of your blog. Without it, your site probably won’t go anywhere.

Instead, what I want to talk about is that other Q-word that always (and rightfully) gets trumped by quality: that being quantity.

Now, before you get up in arms, I am not suggesting – in any way, shape or form – that any blogger, design or otherwise, should make quantity their primary focus. It’s always better to create one quality post than five half-baked articles that say virtually nothing and exist solely for the sake of filling up space and driving up the number of posts on your site.

Personally, I do try to follow a posting schedule. I work towards getting two unique articles or other quality resources posted every week, in addition to my Echoes series and, most recently, Saturday Morning Cartoons (featuring The Brads). Most weeks I’m able to get this done, but sometimes I do fall a bit short. This past week was a prime example, as other commitments seemed to devour all of my time. I admit that, sometimes, it’s difficult not to obsess over meeting this schedule, but I’m committed to posting solid content and avoid cranking out some mindless drivel just to fill up the space.

If I don’t have something worthwhile for my readers, then I just don’t post.

So, bringing things back to the point at hand, this is not an article about going out and writing as much fluff and junk as you possibly can, all for the sake of quantity alone.

Rather, this is an article about the advantages of the quantity of articles that emerges from a commitment to sustained writing and authorship – something which I hope that you are already doing!

It’s about natural, organic growth.

Basically, I just want to encourage you to keep writing. As you produce more quality articles, you’re also creating a broader resource base for readers and search engines. This gives both people and bots more ways to find your blog, more pages to land on, and more articles to read if they choose to delver deeper into your site (through categories, popular posts or related stories).

It only makes sense that this would, in turn, lead to an increase in overall traffic.

In the six months that the Echo Enduring Blog has been live, I’ve actually actively experienced this trend myself. During the first couple of months, I would only get a few hits a day. In the first weeks, there were even some days when I wouldn’t get any traffic at all. Eventually, though, I started to network more and the blog started to get a little more attention. Today, some of the posts I wrote a few months ago are still seeing nice, sustained traffic, coming from a variety of sources.

The cumulative effect of this is that, even without strongly promoting a certain post over the course of a week, I still see a reasonable amount of traffic in a single day.

Probably the best way to visualize this is through some simple arithmetic. Let’s suppose that, on average, each of your posts gets visited ten times a day. This will obviously vary significantly, but ten is a nice round number, and will work well as an average for illustrative purposes.

Using a simple table, we can see how, based on the same average hits per post per day, simply continuing to write and add valuable content to your blog can actually have a dramatic effect on your overall blog traffic!

Number of Posts Average Hits per Post per Day Over 1 Month (30 Days)
5 50 1,500
10 100 3,000
15 150 4,500
25 250 7,500
50 500 15,000
75 750 22,500
100 1,000 30,000
150 1,500 45,000
200 2,000 60,000
300 3,000 90,000
500 5,000 150,000
750 7,500 225,000
1,000 10,000 300,000

It’s pretty simple math (mere multiplication), but somehow it’s still striking to see these kinds of numbers laid out before us. I actually started thinking along these lines while doing some analysis of my own stats, and noticed that I was building a strong base of organic traffic on a daily basis. It was intriguing, so I grabbed my calculator and started doing some simple calculations based on the site’s current trends. What I saw was basically what you see in the table above.

So what’s the point? I think there are two. First, while quality posts are the most important part of a successful blog, it’s ultimately the fusion of quality with a growing quantity that will help increase traffic and lead you down the path of blog success (at least from a strictly statistical position). Wait. I know that some of you are already forming your counter-arguments against this whole quantity idea. You’re probably ready to cite any one of the number of blogs that don’t post all that frequently and don’t rely on quantity for traffic.

Are you sure about that?

Remember, we’re not talking about an all-out Post-a-poloza here, where you need to crank out post after post after post in an effort to artificially boost traffic numbers. Nor are we talking about going head to head with the big blogs (at least for the moment), many of which post at least once daily (and sometimes even more frequently than that).

What we are talking about is the organic nature of the internet, and how, as you continue to post new articles you are also creating new gateways for visitors to find your site. From where I sit, it’s a basic and fundamental mathematical principal, which can be applied to any kind of blog. Even if you only post once a month, that’s one more avenue for traffic to reach your blog than you had last month, and twelve more than last year.

The second, and perhaps more important point is that I’m writing this article as a means of encouragement for all you bloggers out there. The math speaks for itself and my hope is for you see that, even if your numbers aren’t quite where you want them to be today, that doesn’t mean that you can’t reach your goals eventually. Just keep writing and/or producing great content for your blog, and trust that you will gradually see your traffic increase through the organic nature of the internet itself.

Of course, you’ll probably still need to nudge it along here or there (and maybe even shove it from time to time). Promotion is still important. After all, the greatest content in the world isn’t going to matter at all if nobody knows it exists. So keep yourself out there on various social media sites, plugging your blog and your content wherever you can.

Be patient, though. If you provide good, quality content, visitors will start coming. More importantly, they’ll start coming back.

I hope this post makes sense, and that my main point is coming across here. What do you guys think? Has anyone else found this particular trend to be true on your own blogs? What about a different trend? I’d love to hear your thoughts/experiences/reactions!

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Also from Echo Enduring Media:

An Unfolding Tale

About the Author

Matt Ward is a digital artist who lances freely under the moniker of Echo Enduring Media, and specializes in graphics design, illustration and writing. He is also the Creative Director for Highland Marketing, a creative direct marketing company based out of Waterloo, Ontario. You can follow Matt on Twitter

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Comments

Dec 16, 2009

Waheed Akhtar says:

Well written. I agree to quality content even you post only once a week

Dec 16, 2009

Josh says:

Very insightful. I do agree that consistency and perseverance is the key to establishing a loyal readership following. It’s a case of quality over quantity.

Dec 16, 2009

Scrivs says:

While I agree with the principles behind this article I’m not too sure about the math. It could be just a matter of wording, but in the table you say “number of hits per post per day”. This would lead me to believe that for 5 posts each of those posts will receive 50 hits per day and therefore 250 hits overall per day. Over a month that is 7500 hits.

It looks as though you are really trying to say that each post will avg 10 hits a day which I think is a fair assessment if you put the effort into marketing each one. Most blogs though are lucky to even hit 100 quality posts in their lifetime so although the table makes it look easy, the reality is completely different.

Dec 16, 2009

Matt Ward says:

I checked the heading in the table and it does use the word average, so I’m not sure where the confusion there was coming from, but yeah it’s definitely talking about the average posts per day.

Interesting point about the number of quality posts over the lifetime of a blog, though. I agree that some of those higher numbers are pretty lofty, but I’m a firm believer in setting your goals high (as long as you have a series of gradual, shorter term goals too).

Hopefully, though, some of those higher numbers will help other bloggers to keep writing and surpass 100 quality posts!

Thanks for the comment!

Dec 17, 2009

Destiny islands says:

Very well-writted and creative article. I have to agree that blog traffic can be a bit “addicting”, but I wouldn’t say it’s that hard to gain. You just need to know where to look and what your niche is that you need to market to, and you’ll gain visitors real fast!

Dec 17, 2009

Davide Michel Morelli says:

Great article. I hope that my network site (3 blogs for the moment) will hit numbers that you have write in this post table.

Tnx for the article.

Dec 17, 2009

Design Ideas says:

One more thing: Traffic depends from content amount

Dec 17, 2009

Victor Velazquez says:

You make it sound way to easy.

Dec 17, 2009

Matt Ward says:

It is a fairly simple concept. Of course, what I think you’re saying is that it’s a difficult it’s difficult to actually implement. No doubt there. I certainly didn’t mean to make it sound as though this blogging thing was easy. The article was simply meant as an encouragement to people, with the hope that all their hard work will eventually start to pay off.

I apologize if the article made it seem otherwise!

Dec 18, 2009

Crystal says:

Very well written and a great guide. I can say from experience it’s accurate– as long as all the new content is well made and thought out

Jan 19, 2010

Legal Sounds says:

A thoughtful insight and ideas I will use on my blog. You’ve obviously spent some time on this. Well done!

Jun 16, 2010

clippingimages says:

wa…very helping one indeed..thanks for sharing ..

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